This is not a chevron

A chevron (also spelled cheveron, espe­cially in older doc­u­ments) is an inverted V-shaped pat­tern. The word is usu­ally used in ref­er­ence to a kind of fret in archi­tec­ture, or to a badge or insignia used in mil­i­tary or police uni­forms to indi­cate rank or length of ser­vice, or in her­aldry and the designs of flags.

From Wikipedia, Chevron (insignia)

I still see on many web­pages the sign » con­ve­niently used as a right point­ing arrow.
In bread­crumbs, after sec­ondary call-to-action links, etc.

This sym­bol is actu­ally (with it’s brother’s « ) a right quote mark, A.K.A. Guillemet, used in 39 coun­tries in the world (still accord­ing to Wikipedia), in lan­guages like Ara­bic, French, Span­ish or Turk­ish. If you have inter­na­tion­al­iza­tion in mind, using this as an arrow might look really clumsy.

Even if you don’t plan to local­ize your site in one of these locales, it is still seman­ti­cally wrong, and will be under­stood by a browser (and by screen read­ers, and search engine spi­ders) as a right quote mark.

The sym­bol → might be used for the same pur­pose with no seman­tic cost (but it might not exist in the font you like), or you could use an image (and/or CSS magic) if you really are in love with the shape itself…

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